Photographic Looking Part I

 

Jeffries with camera in Alfred Hitchcock's
Rear Window, 1954
http://thisdistractedglobe.com/2007/10/01/rear-window-1954/

What does it means for an image to look photographic?
What does it mean to see the world through photography?

 

 

 

Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window is self-reflective
Within that critique, a rich examination of photography as a practice, media and cultural signifier can be made

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rear Window
Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window, 1954
http://www.moviegoods.com/movie_poster/rear_window_1954.htm

Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window (Special Edition), 2008
http://dvd.ign.com/dor/objects/14272344/rear-window-special-edition/images/rear-window-special-edition-20081002013542423.html?page=mediaFull

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph Nicephore Niepce. View from His Window at Le Gras. c. 1826. Heliograph on pewter plate.
http://greg.org/archive/niepce_positive_print_uta.jpg

 
 
When we are told we will be looking at a photograph, what kind of image, with what qualities, do we expect to see?
In other words, what is a photograph?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunlight at Dawn

Sunlight Through Trees at Dawn 2006
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sunlight_through_trees_at_dawn.jpg

 
Three things needed to create a photograph:
 
1.
Optical device that can control light
2.
Chemical process that can reproduce the effects of light on a surface
3.
Chemical process that can fix the effects of light (the image) permanently
   
   
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ansel Adams.  Valley View, Yosemite.  c. 1933.
http://www.treadwaygallery.com/ONLINECATALOGS/March2004/paintWEB/0701.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Weston. Nude. 1936.
20th Century Photography Museum Ludwig Cologne. Taschen, Koln, 2005.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alfred Stieglitz. Georgia O'Keefe. 1922.
http://www.masters-of-photography.com/S/stieglitz/stieglitz_okeeffe_34_full.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We see so many photographic images in one day now, it is difficult to approximate their number - perhaps tens of thousands?
In fact, we are even fairly unaware of how many hundreds (?) of images are taken of ourselves everyday.
But imagine a time when the average person would only have one, maybe two images made of themselves in their lifetime, and concomitantly, would only see a few photos of others in their lives...

 

Edgar Allan Poe

Abraham Lincoln

John Draper. Miss Dorothy Catherine Draper. c. 1840.
Daguerreotype.

http://click.si.edu/Image.aspx?image=2931&story=226&back=Story

William Pratt.  Edgar Allan Poe.  1849.
Ambrotype
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_kM7t6IwmQlQ/RyjkElE3M6I/AAAAAAAABjU/XjgxmrQClh8/s400/poe+daguerotype.jpg

Matthew Brady Studio. Abraham Lincoln. c. 1863.
Albumen Cabinet Card.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/george_eastman_house/2719970005/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because photographs were made with modern technology - with machines and chemical processes - they were assumed to be "true."
"Seeing is believing." - Anonymous first recorded in 1639

 

Southworth and Hawes. Early Operation Using Ether for Anesthesia. 1847. Daguerreotype.
http://eo.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dosiero:1847_Ether_bySouthworth_Hawes_Getty.jpg
Maxime Du Camp. The Colossus of Abu-Simbel, Nubia. 1850.
Newhall, Beaumont. The History of Photography. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 1982.
John Lamprey. Malayan Male. c. 1868 – 69.
Marien, Mary Warner.  Photography: A cultural History.  Second edition.  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2006.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alexander Gardner. Home of the Rebel Sharpshooter, Gettysburg. 1863.
http://www.littlestregular.com/blog/uploaded_images/sharpshooter-752249.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carlton E. Watkins.  Mt. Broderick, Yosemite.  1861.  Albumen print.
SFMOMA.  Picturing Modernity.  San Francisco: SFMOMA, 1998.
Timothy O' Sullivan. Ancient Ruins in the Canyon de Chelle, New Mexico. 1873. Albumen print.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3178/3020317790_1765c988fe.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eadweard Muybridge. Galloping Horse, Motion Study-Sallie Gardner. June 19, 1878. Collotype.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the hand-held camera was introduced at the end of the 19th century, manufacturers emphasized:
ease of use - democratic because anyone can do it
instantaneous preservation of fleeting moments - capturing history otherwise lost
a bargain - "You press the button, we do the rest."

 

http://www.hfmgv.org/exhibits/pic/1999/kodakadb.jpg

Kodak #1 Camera
http://www.thispublicaddress.com/depression/images/kodak.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kodak Brownie Ads. 1900.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

snapshot = to shoot instinctively without taking aim

 

Photo-Revolver de Poche c. 1882.
http://www.geh.org/fm/mees/htmlsrc/mE58300001_ful.html#topofimage


http://www.pixiq.com/article/-photorevolver-de-poche-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jacques-Henri Lartigue. My Cousin Bichonnade. 1905.
Marien, Mary Warner.  Photography: A cultural History.  Second edition.  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2006.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baby elephant at the zoo c. 1890
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalmediamuseum/2781021952/sizes/m/in/photostream/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unknown Photographer. Two Young Girls. c. 1890.
http://rpkphoto.smugmug.com/Photo-History-1/The-Snapshot-Century/10323935_WVU6s/1/714942735_gP7eY#714942735_gP7eY-L-LB