Taking Risks

 

Sally Mann,The Hot Dog, 1989.
http://www.nomoreheroesanymore.com/imgs/news/13570_6289231024cb22912906ee.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project 4
 

Goal

Craft an artful series of works exploring a clear theme with an intentional message.
Learn
Discover ways to manage new explorations and to encourage growth by taking risks.
Shot Minimum - at least three shots of each of the following:
A subject you have never photographed before
A setting you have never photographed before
A subject that you photographed this semester with unsuccessful results
Print Minimum
Contact Sheet for each roll of film made for this project
A series of photos that present a clear theme with an intentional message
Your best photo from the semester mounted
Charles Fenno Jacobs, December, 1944.
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/picturing
_the_century/images/port_jacobs_71_v112.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jessie and the Deer
Sally Mann, Candy Cigarette, 1915.
hhttp://www.fermoeditore.it/fermomag/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/6.jpg
Sally Mann.  Jessie and the Deer.  1985.
Mann, Sally.  Immediate Family.  New York:  Aperture, 1992.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Light
Sally Mann.  Last Light.  1989.
Mann, Sally.  Immediate Family.  New York:  Aperture, 1992.
Sally Mann. Emmett and the White Boy. 1990.
http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/about/guggenheim-images/show-full/piece/?search=The%20Bohen%20Foundation%20Gift&page=2&f=Acquisition&cr=13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Untitled 14

Untitled 6

Cindy Sherman. Untitled Film Still #14. 1978.
Cruz, Amanda and Elizabeth A. T. Smith.  Cindy Sherman: Retrospective.  Chicago:  Thames & Hudson, 1998.

Cindy Sherman. Untitled Film Still #6. 1977.
Cruz, Amanda and Elizabeth A. T. Smith.  Cindy Sherman: Retrospective.  Chicago:  Thames & Hudson, 1998.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Untitled 21

Cindy Sherman. Untitled Film Still #32. 1979.
Preble, Duane, Sarah Preble and Patrick Frank. Artforms. Seventh ed. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2002.

Cindy Sherman. Untitled Film Still #21. 1978.
Cruz, Amanda and Elizabeth A. T. Smith.  Cindy Sherman: Retrospective.  Chicago:  Thames & Hudson, 1998.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingres' Violin
Man Ray. Ingres' Violin. 1924.
http://6.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_kr3ugiSAEJ1qztk1wo1_500.jpg
Hanah Hoch. Dada Dance. 1922. Photomontage.
http://gypsyart.yolasite.com/art-history/dadaism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ed Ruscha, A Few Palm Tress, 1971.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ed Ruscha, A Few Palm Tress, 1971 / 2003.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lee Miller
Anatomies
Man Ray. Lee Miller (Neck).  1930.
http://4.media.tumblr.com/AyWzJclyuh95oh6xTiWHozfDo1_r2_400.jpg
Man Ray.  Anatomies.  1930.
http://media.photobucket.com/image/%2522anatomies%2522/squeegee_burble/m-man_ray_anatomies.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Claude Cahun. Self-portrait. c. 1929.
Claude Cahun. Self-portrait. c. 1928.
Girls, Guerrilla. The Guerilla Girls' Bedside Companion to the History of Western Art. New York: Penguin Books, 1998.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Danny Lyon, Cal, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, 1965 - 66.
https://artblogsa.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/nyc32749-sm.jpg
Danny Lyon, Sparky and Cowboy,
https://artblogsa.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/nyc32747-sm.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Danny Lyon, From Lindsey’s room, Louisville, 1966.
http://selvedgeyard.com/2009/08/11/iconic-american-images-by-danny-lyon-the-bikeriders-and-beyond/
Danny Lyon, From Dayton to Columbus, Ohio, 1965 - 66.
http://selvedgeyard.com/2009/08/11/iconic-american-images-by-danny-lyon-the-bikeriders-and-beyond/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hans Bellmer. La Poupee (The Doll). c. 1934.  Gelatin silver print.
http://shlomitinberlin.wordpress.com/page/3/
Hans Bellmer.  La Poupee. 1935 - 1937.
http://www.moma.org/collection/browse_results.php?criteria=O%3AAD%3AE%3A452&page_number=1&template_id=1&sort_order=1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Ellen Mark, Hippopotamus and Performer, 1990.
Mary Ellen Mark, Animal Trainer with Elephant, 1989.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Ellen Mark, The Damm Family in their Car, 1987.
Mary Ellen Mark,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Zone System
Simple concept - a black-and-white photographic print represents the visual world as a series of tones ranging from black to white.
zones directly relate to exposure
visualization relates to final print

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remember the rule - expose for shadows develop for highlights
 
zones directly relate to exposure
visualization relates to final print
 
In a scene— in the field— each zone represents a doubling or halving of the luminance— the light reflected from the subject— or equivalently, a difference of one f-stop. The 8 steps between the nine zones represent a luminance range of 256 (28), typical for landscapes on sunny days and somewhat less than negative film can capture. The actual tonal range of scenes can, of course, be very different.
In a print, zone 1 is pure black, zone 9 is pure white, and zone 5 is subjective middle gray, corresponding to a reflectance of about 18%. On good photographic paper, pure white is a little over 90% reflectance and pure black is about 1 – 2% reflectance. The maximum luminance range is around 50 to 100, equivalent to about 6 zones; a good deal less than the 8 hypothetical zones in the original scene. Since the difference between subjective middle gray (18% reflectance) and white (a little over 90%) is a factor of 5, equivalent to only 2.3 f-stops, highlight tones in a print tend to be compressed with respect to tones in a scene. A zone chart printed on paper therefore involves a degree of compromise involving the application of an "S" curve.
Zone System Scale with Stop Details
http://www.basearts.com/curriculum/files/zones_withDetail.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Ellen Mark, Amanda and Her Cousin, 1990.