Healing the Madness
   

Amelia Earhart was the first woman to fly solo, non-stop across the Atlantic. Among her numerous achievements, Earhart earned the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Cross of Knight of the Legion of Honor and the Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society.  She was a Depression-era hero and advocate for women's equality, saying, "A pilot's a pilot. I hope that such equality could be carried out in other fields so that men and women may achieve equally in any endeavor..." She disappeared in 1937 over the Pacific during an attempt to circumnavigate the globe.

 
Quiz 3 will open by Friday, November 13 and must be submitted to Canvas before midnight on Monday, November 16!
 

Sula Bermúdez-Silverman VTLS talk

Thursday at 7 PM!

Zoom Link: https://chapman.zoom.us/j/97954073252

Amelia Earhart, n.d.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Self Portrait

Una Troubridge

Romaine Brooks, Self-Portrait, 1923.
Romaine Brooks, Una, Lady Troubridge, 1924.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Amazon

Natalie Romaine

Romaine Brooks, The Amazon (Natalie Barney), 1920.
Natalie and Romaine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Azaleas

Romaine Brooks, White Azaleas or Black Net, 1910.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In their autobiography, Disavowals Cahun explained, "Masculine? Feminine? It depends on the situation. Neuter is the only gender that always suits me."
   

Cahun Self-Portrait

Suzanne Malherbe

Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore, Self-portrait, c. 1928.
Claude Cahun, Suzanne Malherbe, c. 1928.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kewpee Doll

Claude Cahun, Self-portrait, c. 1929.

 

"Beneath this mask, another mask. I will never be finished lifting off all these faces." - Claude Cahun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don't Kiss Me I Am In Training

Claude Cahun, Don't Kiss Me I Am In Training, c. 1929.
Claude Cahun, Self-portrait, c. 1929.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Claude Cahun, Self-Portrait, c. 1929.
Claude Cahun, Self-Portrait, c. 1929.

 

Joan Riviere's Womanliness as Masquerade 1929

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marlene

Marlene Dietrich

Hannah Hoch, Marlene, 1930.
Marlene Dietrich, Morrocco publicity still, 1933.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carl Van Vecthen, Bessie Smith, 1936.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1930 US census found 40% of art professionals were women
Meret Oppenheim
  • Despite the increased participation of women in the artistic realm, modern imagery is dominated by the nude female body
  • The woman continues to be a passive subject on which male "genius" artists exert control
Ingres' Violin
Man Ray, Ingres' Violin, 1924.
Man Ray, Erotique Voile'e (Meret Oppenheim), 1923.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Object

Meret Oppenheim, Object (Luncheon in Fur), 1936.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lee Miller
Anatomies
Edward Steichen, Lee Miller (center) and other models, for Vogue, 1928.
Man Ray, Lee Miller (Neck), 1930.
Man Ray, Anatomies, 1930.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lee Miller, Solarized Self Portrait, 1930.
Lee Miller, Women with Fire Masks, 1941.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Some critics have tried to classify me as a Surrealist; but I do not consider myself a Surrealist...Really I do not know whether my paintings are Surrealist or not, but I do know that they are the frankest expression of myself." - Frida Kahlo

 
Frida Kahlo, The Broken Column, 1944.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frida Kahlo painting in hospital bed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frida and Diego on Wedding Day

The Two Fridas

Frida and Diego
on their wedding day in 1929
Frida Kahlo, The Two Fridas, 1939.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

retablo = a votive painting that is characteristically small, portable and painted on a tin or wood support

 

Henry Ford Hospital

Frida Kahlo, Henry Ford Hospital, 1932.