From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried
 
Proposed Projects

 

Essay on Scalar

11

Podcast

Timeline

7

6

Material Object

5

Infographic

4

Video

3

Photo Journal (Gallery on Scalar or ??)

2


Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, 1995.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What theses have you developed?

 

Kerry James Marshall, Still Life with Wedding Portrait, 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jan Van Eyck, Arnolfini Marriage, 1434.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louis Agassiz

Ornithology collection at Harvard Museum
of Comparative Zoology


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Delia

Delia

J.T. Zealy, "Delia, country born of African partents, daughter of Renty, Congo," 1850.  Daguerreotype.
J.T. Zealy, "Delia, country born of African partents, daughter of Renty, Congo," profile, 1850.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jack

Renty
J.T. Zealy, "Renty, Congo, B.F. Taylor, Esq. Columbia, S.C.," 1850.  Daguerreotype.
J.T. Zealy, "Renty, Congo, B.F. Taylor, Esq. Columbia, S.C.," profile, 1850.  Daguerreotype.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harvard zoologist, Louis Agassiz intended these photographs to be read as scientific evidence for polygenesis, the idea that human races had separate origins and were thus inescapably and irrevocably different.

 

Jack

Renty
J.T. Zealy, "Jack (driver), Guinea. Plantation of B. F. Taylor, Esq. Columbia, S.C.," 1850.  Daguerreotype.
J.T. Zealy, "Jack (driver), Guinea. Plantation of B. F. Taylor, Esq. Columbia, S.C.," profile, 1850.  Daguerreotype.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jack

Renty
J.T. Zealy, "Fassena (carpenter) Mandingo, plantation of Col. Wade Hampton, near Columbia, South Carolina," 1850.  Daguerreotype.
J.T. Zealy, "Fassena (carpenter) Mandingo, plantation of Col. Wade Hampton, near Columbia, South Carolina," profile, 1850.  Daguerreotype.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jack
Renty
J.T. Zealy, "Jem, Gullah, belonging to F.W.Green, Columbia, S.C.," 1850. Daguerreotype.
J.T. Zealy, "Jem, Gullah, belonging to F.W.Green, Columbia, S.C.," profile, 1850. Daguerreotype.
J.T. Zealy, "Jem, Gullah, belonging to F.W.Green, Columbia, S.C.," back, 1850. Daguerreotype.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jack
Renty
J.T. Zealy, "Alfred, Foulah, belonging to I. Lomas, Columbia, S.C.," profile, 1850.  Daguerreotype.
J.T. Zealy, "Alfred, Foulah, belonging to I. Lomas, Columbia, S.C.," back, 1850.  Daguerreotype.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Delia

J.T. Zealy, "Drana. country born, daughter of Jack, Guinea. Plantation of B.F. Taylor Esq. Columbia S.C.," 1850.  Daguerreotype.
J.T. Zealy, "Drana. country born, daughter of Jack, Guinea. Plantation of B.F. Taylor Esq. Columbia S.C.," profile, 1850.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried

 

Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, 1995 - 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, 1995 - 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, 1995 - 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, 1995 - 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, 1995 - 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, 1995 - 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, 1995 - 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, 1995 - 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, 1995 - 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, 1995 - 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Photographer and critic Allan Sekula contends that the photographic portrait is 'a double system of representation capable of functioning both honorifically and repressively.' Furthermore, he considers these tendencies to be opposing but related poles of portrait practices. Yet what the photographs of Williams and Weems reveal is that these double functions can be evident simultaneously. Their works do not erase the imprint of the repressive institutions that have used black bodies to corroborate theories of deviance and inferiority; instead, their photographs make plain the repression and compel viewers to reflect on this legacy and its currency in our present. However, their work also enables fresh and honorable ways of looking that allow us to see anew the images of black people found in mid-nineteenth-century popular culture and science. For instance, as Weems is a student of folklore and shares an affinity with anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston, her positioning of the photographs of enslaved Africans and African Americans within a context of black diasporic folk practices and beliefs opens the possibility of understanding these people who look so intently at the camera and cameraman as conjurers using their skills of concentration to gain control over their predicament" (Collins, Historic Retrievals, 81).

Carrie Mae Weems, From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, 1995-1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frank Davey, Fallen statue of Louis Agassiz, Stanford University, no. 32,1906